There are some fine systems available to us. The Ocean Research and Conservation Association in Ft. Pierce have developed the F.A.S.T. and Kilroy programs. Fast Assessment of Sediment Toxicity. The map a mile project in Vero is VERY telling. It paints a visual rendering of the pollution, and its strength. Dr. Edie Widder and her staff have engaged the help of students to further this project and has expressed interest in bringing this program south into Martin County. Like all monitoring, this project is under funded. A collaboration of HBOI and ORCA might bring us a couple of Kilroys, one in the St. Lucie, and one at the inlet, but that too is lacking the proper funding. Kilroy provides “real time” information and was supported by the Stuart News editorial staff in October 4, 2011. Editorial: Ocean Research and Conservation Association soliciting donors to continue Kilroy monitoring of Indian River Lagoon http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2011/oct/04/editorial-ocean-research-and-conservation-donors/

At the launching of Kilroy in 2009, U.S. Rep. Tom Rooney, R-Tequesta, said, “Recent economic valuations estimate that the Indian River Lagoon provides approximately $3.7 billion per year in benefits to Florida’s residents and visitors — and recreation, including fishing, boating and swimming, is the largest component of the lagoon’s economic value. I’m interested in ORCA’s Kilroy technology because of its potential to ensure these waters will remain healthy and vibrant for generations to come.”

Indian Riverkeeper worked with ORCA to deploy additional Kilroy water monitoring units, and they will all be uploading their data publicly soon so YOU can track the pollution levels and health of our water. ORCA engineers added instruments, calibrated deployed units, and tuned up communication performance. We attended units at Palm City Bridge, C-23, Evan’s Creek on the St. Lucie River’s north prong, Willoughby Creek, Moore’s Creek, Taylor Creek, two at Queens Cove, and another near Round Island. We are grateful for the efforts of the dedicated, hard working Engineers, Chemists and Scientists at ORCA who made the Kilroy implementation and monitoring possible.

Indian Riverkeeper Marty Baum and an ORCA scientist working with a Kilroy device.